Each sub-school has a Academic Support Team that works with the staff to ensure that every boy’s individual needs are met. Our Heads of Academic Support are excellent staff to contact if you wish to discuss your son’s education further.

Janet Lopez

Janet Lopez

Head of Academic Support (Junior School)

Junior School Support

The role of Academic Support in the Junior School is to initially identify boys with special educational needs who are not achieving at year level or those boys with gaps in their knowledge and understanding, who would benefit from smaller classes in English and/or Mathematics. Analysis of Orientation Day test results, NAPLAN results, school reports, reports from external specialists as well as parent information provided on the parent questionnaire for all new boys, is used to determine students requiring additional support.

FAQs

Expand/Collapse All

How are students identified for Academic Support?

Information is gathered at the beginning of the year in the following ways:

  • Benchmark Assessments: Maths Assessment Interview, Fountas and Pinnell Reading Levels, South Australian Spelling, MultiLit Sounds and Burt Sight Words.
  • Academic Assessment Services testing
  • NAPLAN
  • school reports
  • reports from external agencies
  • parent information
  • The school database provides information about the student’s previous year’s progress. Both sources of information are used to identified students eligible for in-class support and intervention programmes.

If my son is identified for Academic Support, how are his needs catered for?

In-class support is provided by the classroom teacher, the support teacher and Education Assistants during the Literacy and Numeracy core learning blocks. Intervention programmes (LLI, EMU and MultiLit) are offered to provide direct instruction to accelerate learning. The in-class academic programme is differentiated to suit the students’ needs. In Literacy, ability groupings are established based on reading levels and spelling levels.

The support boys predominately work with the support teacher in a small group within the classroom. The classroom teacher will work with the group at least once per week. The groupings remain fluid which allows for students to move in and out of groups as their needs dictate. Mixed ability grouping and ability grouping occurs in Mathematics. The boys who require support are carefully monitored and tracked in collaboration with the class and support teacher. An inclusive model of education is practised in the Junior School.

How are students supported in class?

The same concept is taught for the entire class, however the tasks are modified and scaffolded so that the support students can make progress and construct their learning based on their current knowledge base. In Spelling, Reading and Writing, the teaching is more explicit; the lessons are facilitated based on repetition, skill level and prior knowledge.

How are students with special needs supported?

There are a number of different ways students are supported according to their needs whether they be social emotional, physical, intellectual or behavioural. The school psychologist, specialist EAs, support staff, the pastoral deputy and the chaplain work collaboratively together to support students with social emotional and behavioural needs. Sensory aides and equipment are provided in classrooms to support students so they can optimise their learning.

How are students with different learning styles or specific learning difficulties catered for in support?

The structure and presentation of materials in the support classes is well suited to a number of learning difficulties and needs. Tasks are well scaffolded, concepts are repeated and information is relayed through a variety of multi-sensory activities. A safe learning environment is created where students feel included and valued.  Good pedagogy underpins the Academic Support Programme.

Which students are eligible for funding and how are the funds distributed?

Students are funded if they have a diagnosis relating to social emotional, physical, intellectual or behavioural needs. These students have Individual Education Plans (IEPs). The application for funding is submitted to AISWA. If the student receives funding, the school pools the funds and they are distributed to the Academic Support Department where they are used to fund human resources in the form of specialist Education Assistants and support staff.

What are intervention programmes?

Intervention programmes run for a block of time. They are designed to accelerate learning with targeted groups of children who have been identified as being at risk in their Numeracy or Literacy learning. Intervention programmes run outside of the core learning block to provide additional support.

What intervention programmes are offered?

Extending Mathematical Understanding (EMU) and Levelled Literacy Intervention (LLI).

Are Speech Therapy and Occupational Therapy services offered at Scotch College?

Scotch College offers on-site Speech Therapy and OT. If parents want their son to have therapy, they are provided with the therapists’ contact details and will liaise directly with the therapists for payment and therapy sessions. The therapy sessions are not  scheduled during the Literacy and Numeracy block in Years 1 to 5.

How can I make sure that all parties involved with my son have any relevant information?

The school data base provides information to teachers about a student’s learning styles and differences, along with recommendations as to how to accommodate the student’s needs. The class teachers and the support teachers collaborate with specialist teachers to ensure adjustments are made to their curriculum.

Who has access to my son’s reports and any data that has been collected?

With parent consent, the school psychologist, the classroom teacher and the support teacher have access to diagnostic reports once they have been submitted. When the teachers have read the reports, the school psychologist creates a Learning Disabilities Profile or Educational Guideline which summarises the reports and makes recommendations for all staff members involved with education of the student. The profile is put on the school database so staff can access the information and make modifications and adjustments to the class programme if needed. All data from test results is also put on the database where teachers can access them.

Who case manages my son?

A database of identified boys is communicated to staff and is visible on the Teachers’ Assistant programme. Individual profiles are constructed, based on external agencies’ reports and parent feedback, which outline the boy’s learning needs and the recommended management strategies for all teachers. The classroom teacher is responsible for all students.

If I have concerns about my child who do I approach?

Your first port of call is the classroom teacher and if needed the class teacher will liaise with the Academic Support staff.

Can I access results from assessments?

Standardised and benchmark assessments form part of the student’s academic profile along with ongoing classroom assessments. Parents can request to meet with the class teacher and the support teacher (if relevant) to review all assessment results. Standardised assessments are used primarily for ongoing longitudinal study to inform teaching and learning of the school and to monitor and track student progress.

Is there an Academic Support Programme for Early Childhood?

Support in the Early Years focuses on language development, fine and gross motor skills and social and emotional development.

How will I know if my child needs Academic Support in the Early Years?

An Academic Support teacher works with the PP four days for four periods per week. At the beginning of the first semester, the support teacher administers Numeracy and Literacy assessments to ascertain what is required for the child’s learning and determine the in-class differentiated programme for learning. The support teacher’s role includes observations of learning styles, monitoring and tracking of all students and working with small groups and individuals. In Semester 2, the support teacher focuses on those boys who require extra support to access the curriculum. This will occur within the classroom in the form of differentiated grouping for Numeracy and Literacy.

How will I know if my child needs Speech and OT in the Early Years?

Speech and OT screens take place in PP within the first four or five weeks of term; the reports and results are sent to parents by week 7.  Parents can access more information from the therapists directly if a recommendation for therapy is made. Speech screens take place in Kindergarten at the beginning of Semester 2.  If the teacher has a concern about a Kindergarten boy earlier than August, a full assessment would be recommended.  OT screens do not occur in Kindergarten; however, the OTs can assess individuals if requested by parents.

How do boys transition between the Junior School and the Middle School?

The database provides information on every student’s results. The Middle School can access this information at any time. At the end of Year 5, class lists for Year 6 are formulated with careful consideration to be sure classes are balanced and the support student’s needs are considered. Close communication occurs between the Heads of Academic Support in both sub-schools throughout the year. Handover from Year 5 to Year 6 is thorough; class teachers and the support teachers discuss the needs of students, both academic and socially and emotionally to ensure a good understanding of their needs is communicated.

The role of Academic Support in the Middle School is to initially identify boys with special educational needs who are not achieving at year level or those boys with gaps in their knowledge and understanding, who would benefit from smaller classes in English and/or Mathematics. Analysis of Orientation Day Academic Assessment Services test results, NAPLAN results, school reports, reports from external specialists as well as parent information provided on the parent questionnaire for all new boys, is used to determine students requiring additional support.

Scotch College Middle School caters for these students through the option of attending smaller Mathematics or English classes. These classes are limited to ten students in Year 6 and 14 students in Years 7 and 8. The classes run at the same time as mainstream classes on the timetable. These smaller classes also include an experienced Education Assistant to help deliver the programme and reduce the student to teacher ratio. The support classes follow the same content as mainstream classes but include more skills based work. The structure is also flexible in that students can move into support at any time or move back into mainstream. The aim is to develop the students’ skills as well as their confidence and sense of achievement.

Support teachers also work together with homeroom and class teachers to support in the delivery of the regular curriculum and to enable students to share in an inclusive curriculum with opportunities to realise their potential and value.

SDLD

FAQs

Expand/Collapse All

How are students selected to be in the Academic Support English and Mathematics classes?

Based on information gathered during Orientation Day Academic Assessment Services testing, NAPLAN test results, school reports, reports from external agencies and parent information, students are identified for smaller support classes in English and/or Mathematics classes.

Once in support classes, do students ever move back into mainstream classes?

The support classes follow the same units as mainstream classes and at the same time, meaning students are able to move in and out of support classes as the need arises.

Is the same programme followed in Academic Support classes as mainstream classes?

Yes, the support classes follow the same units as mainstream and at the same time but there is more repetition of concepts and more skills based learning.

What is a Specific Learning Disability (SLD)?

A Specific Learning Disability (SLD) is less common than a learning difficulty. Identification is important as early intervention and appropriate support can reduce the long-term impact of a SLD. Examples of SLDs include Dyslexia and Dysgraphia.

What is a Learning Difficulty (LD)?

There are all sorts of reasons why a boy may struggle to learn or achieve his academic potential. Any learning difficulties that are not learning disabilities may include:

  • gaps in learning
  • social/emotional issues impacting on the ability to focus and learn
  • English being a second language
  • physical issues (hearing, vision)

How are students with different learning difficulties or specific learning difficulties catered for in support?

The structure and presentation of materials in the support classes is well suited to a number of learning difficulties and needs. Tasks are well scaffolded, concepts are repeated and information is relayed both through visual and auditory means. A safe learning environment is created where students are confident giving everything a go. Good pedagogy underpins the Academic Support programme.

How does information on my son’s learning needs get to all his teachers?

Individual learning disability profiles (LDPs) or education guidelines are constructed by the Middle School psychologist, based on external agencies’ reports and parent feedback, and these outline the boy’s learning needs and the recommended management strategies for all teachers. These are communicated to staff and are visible on Seqta so that all staff have immediate access to this information.

Will the English and/or Mathematics support programme and assessments be modified for my son?

Some boys in the support classes might require modified assessments if they are unable to achieve near year group achievement levels. If this is the case, parents are contacted and the modified assessment option is discussed in detail and explained to parents.

Does each boy in support follow a separate programme catering for his specific learning needs?

No, in most instances the delivery of the academic support programme is well suited to students with a variety of learning difficulties.

How will my son manage in larger mainstream classes with subjects besides English and Mathematics?

All subjects and units are well differentiated in mainstream to provide for different learning needs and styles. In addition, in some classes, education assistants will be present to support in the delivery of the subject.

How will withdrawal Mathematics or English classes affect my son’s confidence?

One of the main strengths of the support programme is to build confidence in students so they are willing to and confident enough to give all tasks a go. Students most often turn down opportunities to rejoin mainstream as they feel they are achieving well within the support structure.

How many students are in support classes?

Support classes are limited to 10 students in Year 6 and 14 students in Years 7 and 8. A teacher and an Education Assistant is present in all support classes.

My son is funded in the state system; will this funding be transferred to Scotch College?

No, funding does not automatically transfer from the state to the private sector. A new funding application is made through Scotch College and AISWA.

My son requires extra time in NAPLAN because of his diagnosed learning disability. How will the school accommodate this?

All boys requiring extra time or other accommodations will write the NAPLAN tests in a different classroom to ensure the accommodations are all met.

Libby Muddle

Libby Muddle

Head of Academic Support (Senior School)

Senior School Support

The role of Academic Support in the Senior School is to initially identify boys with special educational needs who are not achieving at year level or those boys with gaps in their knowledge and understanding, who would benefit from smaller classes in English and/or Mathematics. Analysis of Orientation Day test results, NAPLAN results, school reports, reports from external specialists as well as parent information provided on the parent questionnaire for all new boys, is used to determine students requiring additional support.

Academic Support in the Senior School is designed to support boys who are identified as needing specific support in relation to their learning difficulty or disability. Each boy will have a case manager assigned to oversee the support that is offered within class by his teachers.

FAQs

Expand/Collapse All

What is academic support in the Senior School?

It is the provision of academic care, attention and guidance for those boys in Years 9, 10, 11 and 12 who have been diagnosed with a Specific Learning Disability (SLD). The focus of support is helping boys achieve academically. Liaising with parents and relevant staff complements the academic monitoring and encouragement boys receive individually from their Case Manager, who is a member of the Academic Support Team (AST).

I suspect my son has a Learning Difficulty. What is my first step?

Your first step is to contact your son’s House Head and raise your concerns.

How are boys identified to receive academic support?

Boys in the Senior School are identified for academic support via a diagnosis of a Learning Disability by an appropriate health professional including a Psychologist, Speech or Occupational Therapist, Psychiatrist or Paediatrician.

Boys suspected of having an underlying Learning Disability are investigated by their House Head. Those whose difficulties are not accounted for by other factors (such as gaps in learning) are reviewed by the School Psychologist who may recommend referral to an outside professional for appropriate testing.

How do I find out who is my son's Case Manager?

Parents will be informed of their son’s Case Manager prior to the commencement of the academic year.

What is the role of a Case Manager?

A Case Manager is a Senior School teacher and member of the Academic Support Team, assigned to those students within a year group who have a Specific Learning Disability. The Case Manager works with students individually, parents, subject teachers, appropriate House Head and the Senior School Psychologist to support academic achievement.

 

Case management meetings occur in The Residence.

 

    The Year 9 Case Manager:

  • supports the transition to Senior School
  • meets boys on a needs basis
  • liaises with parents, appropriate teachers and House Head
  • helps boys understand and manage their Learning Disability
  • ensures boys can access and participate in the curriculum
  • helps boys build independence and resilience
  • helps boys foster an acceptance/skill of asking for help
  • helps boys build and maintain positive relationships within the school
  • assists with organisation, study skills and time management
  • ensures management strategies are helpful and being implemented in the classroom
  • ensures boys have access to accommodations in class to which they are entitled (eg. extra working time, non-working time, laptop, scribe, enlarged print)
  • accesses available academic services within the College
  • provides support and preparation for NAPLAN
  • where applicable, coordinates an application for accommodations in NAPLAN

 

 

 

    The Year 10 Case Manager:

  • meets boys on a needs basis
  • liaises with parents, appropriate teachers and House Head
  • is available for boys should they struggle or be unsure of academic tasks
  • prepares plans, strategies and approaches to assessment tasks, tests and homework
  • helps boys track academic tasks and cope with the demands of assessment work
  • does not complete work for the boys, but adheres to the philosophy of Academic Support, “Do with, not for.”

 

Year 11/12 Case Managers:

  • meets boys on a needs basis
  • liaise with appropriate school staff as needed
  • builds your son’s independence in learning, planning for assignments, assessments and examinations
  • coaches your son in using his accommodations effectively

 

Year 12 Case Manager:

  • assists your son in applying to the governing body, School Curriculum and Standards Authority (SCSA), for Special Examination Arrangements (SEA).

 

What is the role of an Educational Assistant?

An Educational Assistant is a trained professional who provides assistance to students needing extra support. This may include 1-1 instruction or small group remediation conducted in the classroom or at The Residence.

What is a Specific Learning Disability (SLD)?

A Specific Learning Disability (SLD) is less common than a learning difficulty. Identification is important as early intervention and appropriate support can reduce the long-term impact of a SLD.

What is a Learning Difficulty (LD)?

There are all sorts of reasons why a boy may struggle to learn or achieve his academic potential. Any learning difficulties that are not learning disabilities may include:

  • gaps in learning
  • social/emotional issues impacting on the ability to focus and learn
  • English being a second language
  • physical issues (hearing, vision)

What is a Learning Disability Profile (LDP)?

The Learning Disability Profile is a summary of information about your son’s learning issues. It contains an overview of your son’s condition/learning issues and teacher management strategies most helpful to him and accommodations to which he is entitled.

 

The Senior School psychologist compiles this profile from reports forwarded to the College.

My son has a Specific Learning Disability (SLD). How will teachers support him in class?

Teachers are guided by the Learning Disability Profile (LDP). The LDP summarises your son’s learning issues, teacher management strategies as well as listing accommodations available to him. Case Managers talk with both the subject teachers and your son to ensure the LDP remains active and relevant.

My son has a Specific Learning Disability (SLD). How does key information regarding his learning needs get relayed to all his teachers?

Learning needs are flagged on class lists. Teachers access more detailed information through SEQTA (the school’s administration system) which displays the Learning Disability Profile (LDP). Discussions are held between the Case Manager, teachers and House Head when appropriate.

 

My son has a Specific Learning Disability (SLD). How can I help?

As the first educators of their children, parents are in a great position to help their son understand and accept their learning challenges. Learn about your son’s condition and talk to him about the strengths and weaknesses that he may face. It is helpful that your son is aware he has an identifiable, common, measurable and treatable (not curable) condition.

Many people with a SLD are highly successfully individuals and it helps to know that these successful people are willing to talk about their disabilities. For example, Kerry Stokes, Jamie Oliver, Steve Jobs and Sir Richard Branson all have Dyslexia; Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfeld are on the Autism Spectrum; Michael Phelps, Justin Timberlake and Michael Jordan have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The most important role you can take is helping your son’s self-understanding and acceptance of his condition.

My son needs additional support in literacy, what support is available?

Curriculum teachers in English offer targeted support as part of English classes. Scotch College staff receive ongoing professional development in intervention strategies and cater for boys who may need extra support.

My son needs additional support in numeracy, what support is available?

Curriculum teachers in Mathematics offer targeted support as part of Mathematics classes. Scotch College staff receive ongoing professional development in intervention strategies and cater for boys who may need extra support.

My son is eligible for accommodations but has not been given this opportunity?

You need to contact your Case Manager and discuss. It may be that your son is not wanting to access accommodations at this point.

What additional support is available for NAPLAN?

NAPLAN preparation sessions run at The Residence prior to the set dates for assessments. Dates and times will be advertised to the boys via email and House Heads. English and Mathematics classes also target NAPLAN preparation.

How does my son apply for Special Examination Arrangements (SEA)?

For students in Years 9 to 11 with a diagnosed Specific Learning Disability (SLD), Case Managers ensure examination arrangements are trialled. This is a matter for discussion in a meeting with the Case Manager, you and your son.

My son is in Year 11/12. How does he apply for Special Examination Arrangements in WACE?

The Year 11 and Year 12 Case Managers work with your son to prepare the application to School Curriculum and Standards Authority (SCSA) in March and April of Year 12. Case Managers are in contact with parents over the period of Year 11 and Year 12 regarding the requirements for this application. It is important to ensure that your son has a valid psychoeducational report (within two years and 10 months of the date of application) as part of this application process.

How are students in the IB Diploma accommodated for learning and other disabilities?

Scotch College has and continues to have boys with learning challenges enrolled in the IB Diploma and they have been successful. Appropriate accommodations/entitlements are ascertained by the school’s Psychologist and the IB Diploma Coordinator. The IBO are very generous with accommodations. Their criteria are very different to WACE requirements.

My son is studying VET and General courses (Years 11 and 12 only). What support does the Academic Support Team provide?

If your son has a Specific Learning Disability (SLD) or other disability, he may be eligible for arrangements in accordance with the Guidelines for Disability as issued by School Curriculum and Standards Authority (SCSA). The arrangements are applied for school-based assessments and the Externally Set Task (EST) in Year 12. Case Managers liaise with teachers, the Careers Advisor and the Workplace Coordinator to ensure that your son’s programmes are suitable to his needs.

My son has an IEP. What is an IEP?

An Individual Education Plan (IEP) is a documented plan created for your son, by your son’s Case Manager in consultation with your son, parents, teachers and House Head. This plan outlines academic goals and describes a set of strategies to address your son’s particular needs. IEPs are reviewed each term.

Case Managers liaise with teachers, the Career Advisor and the Workplace Coordinator to ensure that your son’s programmes are suitable to his needs.

MultiLit (“Making Up Lost Time In Literacy”) is a leading provider of effective literacy instruction in Australasia.

FAQs

What is MultiLit?

MultiLit (Making Up Lost Time In Literacy) is an extensively research-based programme that has been developed for low progress readers. It employs explicit, systemic individual instruction focusing on what scientific research has shown to be the essential components of learning to read, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary and comprehension.

Reading is the product of decoding and listening comprehension. To be able to decode words, students need to be able to segment and blend the sounds in spoken words (phonemic awareness) and to have a full grasp of letter-sound correspondences (phonics). In order to understand the words that they read, students need to be able to decode words easily and quickly (fluency), know the meanings of the words they read (vocabulary) and have a good understanding of spoken language forms together with a good general knowledge (comprehension). In summary MultiLit focuses on the five key areas outlined above.

How is the MultiLit programme delivered at Scotch College?

This intensive one-on-one Literacy Intervention Programme is individually tailored to meet the needs of each student. The programme includes either the MultiLit Word Attack or the Extension component as well as reinforced reading, sight words, spelling, homophones, dictation and comprehension.

The lessons range from 45 minutes to an hour which the student attends three times a week onsite with a trained staff tutor. Students will either attend MultiLit for a semester or more depending on their needs.

The MultiLit lessons will be timetabled either before school or during their non-core subjects so as to cause minimum disruption to their regular classroom programme.

How are students identified for MultiLit in the Junior School?

The class teachers and the support teacher identify the boys based on information gathered from spelling, reading, phonic assessments and performance in Years 1 and 2. Students are identified as needing specific decoding intervention so they can access text. Students with a learning disability of dyslexia are recommended for the programme as it primarily focuses on decoding and encoding. Once identified, they are referred to the MultiLit Coordinator who will administer a MultiLit placement test.

How are students identified for the MultiLit programme in the Middle School?

Primary identification of boys new to Scotch College for this programme, is through looking at reading and spelling results from the Orientation Day Academic Assessment Services tests. Parents will then be contacted by the Head of Academic Support or by the Middle School psychologist to give them information of the test results and of the MultiLit service that the school provides.

Which students are offered the MultiLit programme?

MultiLit is offered on a needs basis to students from Years 3 to 8 who show a significant discrepancy between their chronological age and their reading and spelling age.

Is it an additional cost to parents?

This service is offered at a highly reduced rate and is on a cost recovery basis only. The extra cost is only used to pay tutor wages and for the administration of the programme.

How long does the MultiLit Programme run?

MultiLit runs for a minimum of 16 weeks. Generally, students participate in the programme for 12 months.

What happens if my child misses a MultiLit lesson?

We offer at least three replacement lessons a semester to cover any absences that occur due to school commitments such as excursions or sporting events.

How will I know if my son is progressing?

We monitor and track the progress of each student and then meet to discuss these results with the parents as well as inviting the parents to observe their son working.